Why Transition?

Modern Appalachia

In the late nineteenth century—about the same time Appalachia was “discovered” by urban journalists who told stories of “a strange land and a peculiar people”— Central Appalachia became an important source of the coal and timber that would build the modern American economy. More…

Growth and Change

John F. Kennedy’s 1960 Presidential primary victory in West Virginia opened the door to a new era of political and media attention to the reality of persistent poverty in Appalachia. More…

Where We Stand

But the disparities between Central Appalachia and the rest of the country persist still today. The area roughly comprising West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, southwest Virginia, east Tennessee and southeast Ohio remains one of the poorest places in the United States… More…

Coal and the Future

Some of the clearest benefits of the industrialization of the region have been the good-paying jobs for those working in the coal industry. More…

Time for Transition

Now is a critical moment in our region’s history, and big choices are in front of us. It’s time to start talking more seriously about the coming transition. What we decide to do over the next decade or two will set the course for many years to come. More…